NUTRITION

Treating Behavioural Issues Without Medication (Part 2)

By Sally Gray

Posted  June 10 2017 | 0 Shares

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(This is Part Two of the two-part series, “Treating Behavioural Issues Without Medication.”)

Of course, there is more to this picture than simply food. As a result of the generational impact of living in an industrialised world, we have been exposed to a range of elements that do not support and are, in fact, damaging to human health. Examples of these are industrial and medical toxins from pharmaceuticals, dentistry, farming, and mining. Even typical household cleaners and personal care products are mostly toxic.

These modern poisons have left their mark on human health: Many of us carry toxins within us that, over time, interfere with how the body functions at a cellular level. They also have the potential to drive disease of all kinds: ellular toxicity is recognised as a significant contributor to inflammation, an immune response that is central to all chronic health issues from cancer to autoimmune disease.

The bottom line is this: We are more toxic as parents, which naturally impacts our children. The issue is twofold for our kids: They can only be as healthy as we are as their parents, AND they are more susceptible to the myriad toxins in our environment by the very virtue of being young and having immune systems that are not fully developed. It appears the human body is simply not capable of enduring the punishment of the modern diet and lifestyle.

Another key contributor to health issues that is routinely ignored is our emotional health. Stress is powerful enough to cause health issues and should not be glossed over. Epigenetics is the branch of science that looks at how our environment impacts our genetic expression, our health, or disease.

There are two key factors that have the greatest impact: nutrition and toxicity. Nutrition is, of course, driven by the food we eat: Real and wholefoods are recommended. Toxicity is driven by the factors above, chemical elements introduced from the outside into the body AND the results of internal reactions. You may not have thought about this before, but the body creates its own toxicity, which of course it has been designed to process. Detoxification is an innate human function.

However, our bodies are producing more toxins than ever, in dealing with the external environment, and the subsequent internal reactions such as elevated stress which is implicated in an increase in a range of inflammatory elements in the body such as cortisol, the stress hormone.

In treating patients (and behavioural issues in particular), we need to ensure that ALL the bases are covered. It is ludicrous to view the human organism as anything less than multidimensional. We are not just a physical blob and no system works independently of any other. We do ourselves a disservice if we approach our health in any other way. We must look at:

  1. Our health history and prepare our own timeline to determine imbalance.
  2. The testing required: uncovering the root cause of disease.
  3. Personal food prescription: creating a unique approach to healing and optimal health.
  4. Emotional wellbeing practices; daily stress-relieving techniques to heal.
  5. Follow up and adjust; stay tuned in to maintain forward momentum.

With each of these elements addressed, healing potential is maximised. In my clinical experience, I have found that neglecting even one of these aspects can lead to prolonged suffering so be sure to write these down and use them as your guidance system on your journey. Of course these same areas require focus if you are undertaking a preventative health approach so you can look forward to long term vitality, peace and optimal mental health for life!

Sally Gray is the founder of Real Healthy Kids.

Read Part One of this series here.

Reviewed by Sally Gray 10 June 2017 references
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This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

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Treating Behavioural Issues Without Medication (Part 2)

NUTRITION

(This is Part Two of the two-part series, “Treating Behavioural Issues Without Medication.”)

Of course, there is more to this picture than simply food. As a result of the generational impact of living in an industrialised world, we have been exposed to a range of elements that do not support and are, in fact, damaging to human health. Examples of these are industrial and medical toxins from pharmaceuticals, dentistry, farming, and mining. Even typical household cleaners and personal care products are mostly toxic.

These modern poisons have left their mark on human health: Many of us carry toxins within us that, over time, interfere with how the body functions at a cellular level. They also have the potential to drive disease of all kinds: ellular toxicity is recognised as a significant contributor to inflammation, an immune response that is central to all chronic health issues from cancer to autoimmune disease.

The bottom line is this: We are more toxic as parents, which naturally impacts our children. The issue is twofold for our kids: They can only be as healthy as we are as their parents, AND they are more susceptible to the myriad toxins in our environment by the very virtue of being young and having immune systems that are not fully developed. It appears the human body is simply not capable of enduring the punishment of the modern diet and lifestyle.

Another key contributor to health issues that is routinely ignored is our emotional health. Stress is powerful enough to cause health issues and should not be glossed over. Epigenetics is the branch of science that looks at how our environment impacts our genetic expression, our health, or disease.

There are two key factors that have the greatest impact: nutrition and toxicity. Nutrition is, of course, driven by the food we eat: Real and wholefoods are recommended. Toxicity is driven by the factors above, chemical elements introduced from the outside into the body AND the results of internal reactions. You may not have thought about this before, but the body creates its own toxicity, which of course it has been designed to process. Detoxification is an innate human function.

However, our bodies are producing more toxins than ever, in dealing with the external environment, and the subsequent internal reactions such as elevated stress which is implicated in an increase in a range of inflammatory elements in the body such as cortisol, the stress hormone.

In treating patients (and behavioural issues in particular), we need to ensure that ALL the bases are covered. It is ludicrous to view the human organism as anything less than multidimensional. We are not just a physical blob and no system works independently of any other. We do ourselves a disservice if we approach our health in any other way. We must look at:

  1. Our health history and prepare our own timeline to determine imbalance.
  2. The testing required: uncovering the root cause of disease.
  3. Personal food prescription: creating a unique approach to healing and optimal health.
  4. Emotional wellbeing practices; daily stress-relieving techniques to heal.
  5. Follow up and adjust; stay tuned in to maintain forward momentum.

With each of these elements addressed, healing potential is maximised. In my clinical experience, I have found that neglecting even one of these aspects can lead to prolonged suffering so be sure to write these down and use them as your guidance system on your journey. Of course these same areas require focus if you are undertaking a preventative health approach so you can look forward to long term vitality, peace and optimal mental health for life!

Sally Gray is the founder of Real Healthy Kids.

Read Part One of this series here.

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 10 June 2017
references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • Doc id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

make a comment

0 comments

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latest articles

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MEET THE EXPERTS

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