n

Lisa Corduff

Whole Foods Blogger

Creator of \"Small Steps to Whole Foods\" and \"Small Steps to Fermenting\"

NUTRITION

The Secret to Making Kids Want to Eat Whole Foods

By Lisa Corduff

Posted  August 23 2016 | 0 Shares

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Lisa Corduff is a whole foods blogger and mum of three very young children. She is also the creator of two online programs that encourage small, incremental steps toward incorporating whole foods into the family diet. In this article, transcribed from a video, Dr. Kristy Goodwin interviews Lisa on how she got started and the philosophy behind the programs.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Welcome to this video, I’m having the extreme pleasure of introducing to you Lisa Corduff. For those of you who haven’t met Lisa before, she is the creator of “Small Steps to Whole Foods,” which is an eight-week online program that brings together the biggest and the best names in the health and whole foods industry.

She delivers inspiring and educational insights into the world of what real food really is. Lisa breaks things down into really small steps, and has had over two thousand participants who have participated in her programs, who have created lifestyle changes that they never thought were possible.

Welcome Lisa, great to have you here.

Lisa Corduff:

Thank you, Kristy.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Pleasure. So we’re focusing today on children’s gut health and how time-poor busy parents can start to take small steps to implementing changes that will promote our children’s gut health.

This is why I love your philosophy: I have to confess, I have completed Lisa’s small steps program and her fermenting program as well, and it worked.

I’m a time-poor busy mum and I’ve managed to make really simple changes and that’s why I love Lisa’s philosophy. It’s very practical, it’s very achievable.

Lisa, why do you think it’s important that parents at least consider their children’s gut health, and perhaps how you started to dive into this.

Lisa Corduff:

You see, my whole business is built around talking to experts about health and whole foods. I would speak to naturopaths and psychologists holistic nutritionists — a whole range of people. And everything is coming back to the gut. I had come from a very standard upbringing, nothing fancy about my ‘80s and ‘90s childhood, but when I had my kids, I was like, okay what is healthy food? I don’t even know. Why didn’t anyone teach me this stuff?

So my progress along that path. Cutting out a load of the processed food and going to back to basics has taken quite a long time. And it’s funny because focusing on gut health, I think the first thing that you can do is eliminate a lot of the inflammatory foods that damage our gut lining, which is literally from here (motions to lips) to your bum. So when you talk about gut health, that’s like the whole digestive tract.

These things that we’re eating all the time, all that food that’s made in factories from chemicals and highly refined ingredients — it’s not easy for our body to digest that stuff. And our kids start on that really, really young. So that was the first simple thing I did. I thought right, well, the more times — look, this is not to say I don’t have biscuits in my pantry — but the more times I can eliminate the stuff that’s going to damage their gut, the better. So that was literally the first place I started. And I thought that that was kind of good enough for quite a long time, until I started to go to the next stage of that journey.

I think it’s okay for things to take stages because what I learned about gut health in kids is, if your kids are getting sick all the time, then their immune system is compromised. I mean we all know that when kids start daycare, that kind of stuff, they get a lot of things. But if you want to do the best thing that you can for your kids, 60%-70% of our immune cells are found in our gut. If your gut is compromised, you’re gonna be getting sick all the time. Like you know all those kids with constant runny noses? It’d be like, what’s going in on your gut?

I’ve interviewed so many people, it’s fascinating, I’ve learned so many things. Basically it’s about protecting their immunity. And also, I’ve learned a lot about how our moods and behaviour are affected by gut imbalances. So if you’ve got poor gut health, if your kids are kind of going off the rails after certain foods, they’re waking up a lot at night for no reason, oftentimes, that’s got a lot to do with the health of their gut.

So for me it was kind of a no-brainer. I want well-behaved, well kids! So my focus went on that. I felt like I was already on the path in some ways. We’re trying to eat whole foods as often as we can — not perfectly for sure. And then it kind of continued on from there.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

You touched on two really important things there. (One is) that idea of making just small, incremental changes. When we’re becoming a lot more conscious as parents about what our kids are eating, and you know, an awareness of general health and well-being, we can get really easily tempted to make huge, sweeping changes that are unsustainable, not practical or long-term. And so I love your suggestion that if you just look, first off, into what your kids are eating, trying to eliminate as best as possible those foods, so just make small steps progressively.

The other thing you touched on that I think was really interesting (is) this whole idea of this symbiotic relationship between our gut health and every aspect of our well-being. Kids’ behaviour. It affects their immunity, it obviously affects their digestion, the whole gamut of our lifestyle. I think it’s fascinating that it has such a cascading effect (that) if we get our kids’ gut health right and our gut health right, that it would have those huge benefits long-term.

Lisa Corduff:

People have known this for centuries, you know? There’s a reason why chicken soup is a healing food in so many different cultures, because the extracting, the collagen, and all the goodness from the bones of chicken, and the benefits of that food as a healing source to our gut means that so much is improved. It’s the reason why people bring people chicken soup! And we’ve lost that connection to the super simple things we do to maintain our health.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

It isn’t complicated and I love that. My beautiful mother-in-law turned up this morning to collect my son to take him for the day to play with. But she turned up with her own homemade chicken soup because she knows I’ve been unwell, and she said just call it mother instinct, mother-in-law’s instinct. She turned up with the chicken soup, which is a blessing, and a whole lot of other beautiful food. I hit the jackpot with the mother-in-law. I think we think gut health and we tend to think, this is going to be so complicated and really difficult, but it really is just simple things we can implement.

You also touched on something, and I think this is the exciting bit. You said, for years we’ve known, or a lot of experts have known, that gut health is the general root of our general health and well-being. I think it’s exciting that science is slowly catching up. There is an emerging body of research from a whole range of different disciplines that is actually telling us yes, gut health is critical. So it’s nice that we’re getting that scientific validation as well, and it’s not just a sort of alternative way of thinking about our health.

Lisa Corduff:

Yes it’s nice. I’m not making this up. You know, when I’ve got these skeptical people around me about naturopaths and alternative therapies and you can actually point people in the direction of — I mean, I know there’s a GP in Brisbane, he’s been a GP for 30 years, and he realised he wasn’t actually curing people by prescribing medications. They absolutely have a place, he doesn’t deny that. He went on to do this more integrative approach, which focuses on gut health.

So when people, when professionals like that are going, hang on a minute, I love my craft, I want to help people heal, but there’s more to this story than what we’ve known. It’s a beautiful thing, and it’s very reassuring for parents. Kids with eczema and stuff like that, when anything that’s happening on your skin is often absolutely to do with what’s happening in your gut. It’s an expression of what’s going on inside. And people who go from doctor to doctor, they don’t know the answers, and they’re doing really full-on stuff. And they just need to hit that person who goes, maybe we need at —

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

The root cause.

Lisa Corduff:

Yeah! When I started to do a little bit more learning about it, and wanted to take it to the next level, I knew that probiotics were a good choice, but they can be really expensive and hard to get kids to take. And my husband — I mean he’s not a tight ass, but he has a Croatian background, he’s got that kind of love of the earth, likes growing things.

I was buying all these expensive fermented sauerkrauts and all that kind of stuff, which he was just loving, we were all enjoying. And I said, I’m pretty sure that I could make this. And that started us off on — started him off, I’m totally just eating it — on the fermented foods bandwagon.

I reckon there’s three things that I do all the time, which is try to limit the amount of processed and inflammatory foods. Have a good stock going, or broth. It’s just so easy to cook up some bones, as we mentioned before, and my small step is when they see me putting together my broth while I’ve got a baby on my hip, trying to get out of the door, and trying to get my husband to just film me, like, can you just get me, just putting the bones and the veggies in the slow cooker? And video done! Stock on. Because that’s how easy it can be and we’ve forgotten that it can be that easy.

Then the fermented foods and drinks. I think you’ve made kombucha, which is awesome. And I like kefir a lot, which is just little grains. But you know, my kids really like sauerkraut and pickles. So we just learned how to make the pickles, and the kids just literally take that and go chomp, chomp, chomp. And they’ve got no idea of all that awesome probiotic goodness that they’re eating.

For parents who struggle with getting their kids to eat that sort of stuff, the thing that I’ve also learnt is that the brine that it’s kept in, is filled with probiotics too. So if your kids aren’t a fan of actually eating that stuff, you could just put some of the — drizzle it on top of some spaghetti bolognese, give it to them. Find other ways to get it into the foods that you’re eating, because that’s gonna have amazing benefits, too.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Excellent. So are there any particular ways that you introduce these fermented foods to your kids, or have they always been consuming them?

Lisa Corduff:

No, they haven’t been eating them or consuming them all the time. I would say it was probably about a year ago that we really got serious. Sunny’s 5, and I have a 4-year-old and a 2-year-old. I’d say about a year and a half, maybe.

The way that we have done it is, the way that I try to do, introducing lots of new things, is getting the kids involved in cooking. My daughter, the 4-year-old, sits up on a bench, and there’s all these jars out, and Nick’s got his cucumbers, and mustard seeds, and the dill, and whatever. And she just helps him put stuff in the containers, and then put the lids on them, and it’s kind of like a science experiment, so then they get to go, and they wait a few days, and they hear the “psssssss” coming out of the jars.

When they’re a part of the process, they’re so much more into it, I find. When they each get their own jar, and they get to open it, it’s like wow, your pickles or something.

The other thing also, I think, is that they see us eating it. So we add sauerkraut or kimchi to our plate all the time. Or it might be put on top of the salad, and they just get naturally curious.

And I don’t force foods. I just say, would you like to try some? And another trick that I definitely — trick, that makes it sound so devious, but it’s not — around trying new foods is that, when we sit at the dinner table, we just have bowls of stuff, so they can help themselves, you know? If it’s sausages and potatoes and some veggies, they get to pick and choose things on they plate. If there’s a bowl of sauerkraut there, they’ll just dip the spoon and put some on their plate, and they’re so much more likely to eat it.

But you do have to be careful with fermented foods. You can’t go from zero to here straightaway. It’s important to start slowly with them. It can make you quite gassy. They don’t actually need that much in order to be getting some really good benefits.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

I think we discovered that the hard way. When we were starting to introduce some fermented foods, we bought a whole bottle of kombucha and gave it to my son, and he was a bit sensitive at first. Again, it’s that reminder, you know that I think they need exposure over time. I’ve heard lots of people talking about kids needing to be introduced to foods sometimes 15 times before they’ll take a liking to it, which blew my mind, and the bank account, too.

But I think that over time, they do develop that taste, preference as well. He then one day decided to consume a whole bottle and we really discovered the gassy side effects of going gung-ho. So I think that’s important. And again, what ties in so nicely with your whole philosophy is just those small incremental steps that we need to implement.

Our second one’s a bit of a selective eater. When we started to make some of our fermented foods, his involvement was a really big point of difference. He loves that sizzle, too. He knows when he hears that sizzle — he calls it sizzle day, so there’s that sense of anticipation. And kids love being involved in the cooking process. It’s so important.

In the module I talked a lot about trying to modulate kids’ stress. Feeling like they belong and that they’ve got strong family rituals is really important in helping children regulate their stress as well. Cooking is you know, such an important part of our life and for our kids as well.

Lisa Corduff:

You know so much good stuff, Kristy.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

I do! I just want to tie (in) one thing and then we’ll wrap it up after this. When you were talking before about our kids copying us, eating particular types of foods, we know from the neuroscience that our kids have something called mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are basically little nerves that cause our kids to copy all our partners’ worst habits.

Our brains are primed to copy. This is why newborn babies poke their tongue out after 15 minutes even after they’ve been breastfed. We’re literally born wired to copy, and our kids are doing that, so I think that’s such a powerful reminder too that you know we need to make those small steps over time and for our kids to be exposed to us eating the sort of food that we want to that will promote their gut health. So again there’s the science behind it.

Lisa Corduff:

Ugh, I just love hearing that there’s science behind my random parenting, you know?

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Absolutely. Absolutely. I want to wrap up by saying a huge thank you for your time.

This interview has been slightly edited for clarity. You can watch the whole interview on Dr. Kristy Goodwin’s module in the Kids Gut Health Masterclass.

Reviewed by Lisa Corduff 23 August 2016 references
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This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

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The Secret to Making Kids Want to Eat Whole Foods

NUTRITION

Lisa Corduff is a whole foods blogger and mum of three very young children. She is also the creator of two online programs that encourage small, incremental steps toward incorporating whole foods into the family diet. In this article, transcribed from a video, Dr. Kristy Goodwin interviews Lisa on how she got started and the philosophy behind the programs.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Welcome to this video, I’m having the extreme pleasure of introducing to you Lisa Corduff. For those of you who haven’t met Lisa before, she is the creator of “Small Steps to Whole Foods,” which is an eight-week online program that brings together the biggest and the best names in the health and whole foods industry.

She delivers inspiring and educational insights into the world of what real food really is. Lisa breaks things down into really small steps, and has had over two thousand participants who have participated in her programs, who have created lifestyle changes that they never thought were possible.

Welcome Lisa, great to have you here.

Lisa Corduff:

Thank you, Kristy.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Pleasure. So we’re focusing today on children’s gut health and how time-poor busy parents can start to take small steps to implementing changes that will promote our children’s gut health.

This is why I love your philosophy: I have to confess, I have completed Lisa’s small steps program and her fermenting program as well, and it worked.

I’m a time-poor busy mum and I’ve managed to make really simple changes and that’s why I love Lisa’s philosophy. It’s very practical, it’s very achievable.

Lisa, why do you think it’s important that parents at least consider their children’s gut health, and perhaps how you started to dive into this.

Lisa Corduff:

You see, my whole business is built around talking to experts about health and whole foods. I would speak to naturopaths and psychologists holistic nutritionists — a whole range of people. And everything is coming back to the gut. I had come from a very standard upbringing, nothing fancy about my ‘80s and ‘90s childhood, but when I had my kids, I was like, okay what is healthy food? I don’t even know. Why didn’t anyone teach me this stuff?

So my progress along that path. Cutting out a load of the processed food and going to back to basics has taken quite a long time. And it’s funny because focusing on gut health, I think the first thing that you can do is eliminate a lot of the inflammatory foods that damage our gut lining, which is literally from here (motions to lips) to your bum. So when you talk about gut health, that’s like the whole digestive tract.

These things that we’re eating all the time, all that food that’s made in factories from chemicals and highly refined ingredients — it’s not easy for our body to digest that stuff. And our kids start on that really, really young. So that was the first simple thing I did. I thought right, well, the more times — look, this is not to say I don’t have biscuits in my pantry — but the more times I can eliminate the stuff that’s going to damage their gut, the better. So that was literally the first place I started. And I thought that that was kind of good enough for quite a long time, until I started to go to the next stage of that journey.

I think it’s okay for things to take stages because what I learned about gut health in kids is, if your kids are getting sick all the time, then their immune system is compromised. I mean we all know that when kids start daycare, that kind of stuff, they get a lot of things. But if you want to do the best thing that you can for your kids, 60%-70% of our immune cells are found in our gut. If your gut is compromised, you’re gonna be getting sick all the time. Like you know all those kids with constant runny noses? It’d be like, what’s going in on your gut?

I’ve interviewed so many people, it’s fascinating, I’ve learned so many things. Basically it’s about protecting their immunity. And also, I’ve learned a lot about how our moods and behaviour are affected by gut imbalances. So if you’ve got poor gut health, if your kids are kind of going off the rails after certain foods, they’re waking up a lot at night for no reason, oftentimes, that’s got a lot to do with the health of their gut.

So for me it was kind of a no-brainer. I want well-behaved, well kids! So my focus went on that. I felt like I was already on the path in some ways. We’re trying to eat whole foods as often as we can — not perfectly for sure. And then it kind of continued on from there.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

You touched on two really important things there. (One is) that idea of making just small, incremental changes. When we’re becoming a lot more conscious as parents about what our kids are eating, and you know, an awareness of general health and well-being, we can get really easily tempted to make huge, sweeping changes that are unsustainable, not practical or long-term. And so I love your suggestion that if you just look, first off, into what your kids are eating, trying to eliminate as best as possible those foods, so just make small steps progressively.

The other thing you touched on that I think was really interesting (is) this whole idea of this symbiotic relationship between our gut health and every aspect of our well-being. Kids’ behaviour. It affects their immunity, it obviously affects their digestion, the whole gamut of our lifestyle. I think it’s fascinating that it has such a cascading effect (that) if we get our kids’ gut health right and our gut health right, that it would have those huge benefits long-term.

Lisa Corduff:

People have known this for centuries, you know? There’s a reason why chicken soup is a healing food in so many different cultures, because the extracting, the collagen, and all the goodness from the bones of chicken, and the benefits of that food as a healing source to our gut means that so much is improved. It’s the reason why people bring people chicken soup! And we’ve lost that connection to the super simple things we do to maintain our health.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

It isn’t complicated and I love that. My beautiful mother-in-law turned up this morning to collect my son to take him for the day to play with. But she turned up with her own homemade chicken soup because she knows I’ve been unwell, and she said just call it mother instinct, mother-in-law’s instinct. She turned up with the chicken soup, which is a blessing, and a whole lot of other beautiful food. I hit the jackpot with the mother-in-law. I think we think gut health and we tend to think, this is going to be so complicated and really difficult, but it really is just simple things we can implement.

You also touched on something, and I think this is the exciting bit. You said, for years we’ve known, or a lot of experts have known, that gut health is the general root of our general health and well-being. I think it’s exciting that science is slowly catching up. There is an emerging body of research from a whole range of different disciplines that is actually telling us yes, gut health is critical. So it’s nice that we’re getting that scientific validation as well, and it’s not just a sort of alternative way of thinking about our health.

Lisa Corduff:

Yes it’s nice. I’m not making this up. You know, when I’ve got these skeptical people around me about naturopaths and alternative therapies and you can actually point people in the direction of — I mean, I know there’s a GP in Brisbane, he’s been a GP for 30 years, and he realised he wasn’t actually curing people by prescribing medications. They absolutely have a place, he doesn’t deny that. He went on to do this more integrative approach, which focuses on gut health.

So when people, when professionals like that are going, hang on a minute, I love my craft, I want to help people heal, but there’s more to this story than what we’ve known. It’s a beautiful thing, and it’s very reassuring for parents. Kids with eczema and stuff like that, when anything that’s happening on your skin is often absolutely to do with what’s happening in your gut. It’s an expression of what’s going on inside. And people who go from doctor to doctor, they don’t know the answers, and they’re doing really full-on stuff. And they just need to hit that person who goes, maybe we need at —

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

The root cause.

Lisa Corduff:

Yeah! When I started to do a little bit more learning about it, and wanted to take it to the next level, I knew that probiotics were a good choice, but they can be really expensive and hard to get kids to take. And my husband — I mean he’s not a tight ass, but he has a Croatian background, he’s got that kind of love of the earth, likes growing things.

I was buying all these expensive fermented sauerkrauts and all that kind of stuff, which he was just loving, we were all enjoying. And I said, I’m pretty sure that I could make this. And that started us off on — started him off, I’m totally just eating it — on the fermented foods bandwagon.

I reckon there’s three things that I do all the time, which is try to limit the amount of processed and inflammatory foods. Have a good stock going, or broth. It’s just so easy to cook up some bones, as we mentioned before, and my small step is when they see me putting together my broth while I’ve got a baby on my hip, trying to get out of the door, and trying to get my husband to just film me, like, can you just get me, just putting the bones and the veggies in the slow cooker? And video done! Stock on. Because that’s how easy it can be and we’ve forgotten that it can be that easy.

Then the fermented foods and drinks. I think you’ve made kombucha, which is awesome. And I like kefir a lot, which is just little grains. But you know, my kids really like sauerkraut and pickles. So we just learned how to make the pickles, and the kids just literally take that and go chomp, chomp, chomp. And they’ve got no idea of all that awesome probiotic goodness that they’re eating.

For parents who struggle with getting their kids to eat that sort of stuff, the thing that I’ve also learnt is that the brine that it’s kept in, is filled with probiotics too. So if your kids aren’t a fan of actually eating that stuff, you could just put some of the — drizzle it on top of some spaghetti bolognese, give it to them. Find other ways to get it into the foods that you’re eating, because that’s gonna have amazing benefits, too.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Excellent. So are there any particular ways that you introduce these fermented foods to your kids, or have they always been consuming them?

Lisa Corduff:

No, they haven’t been eating them or consuming them all the time. I would say it was probably about a year ago that we really got serious. Sunny’s 5, and I have a 4-year-old and a 2-year-old. I’d say about a year and a half, maybe.

The way that we have done it is, the way that I try to do, introducing lots of new things, is getting the kids involved in cooking. My daughter, the 4-year-old, sits up on a bench, and there’s all these jars out, and Nick’s got his cucumbers, and mustard seeds, and the dill, and whatever. And she just helps him put stuff in the containers, and then put the lids on them, and it’s kind of like a science experiment, so then they get to go, and they wait a few days, and they hear the “psssssss” coming out of the jars.

When they’re a part of the process, they’re so much more into it, I find. When they each get their own jar, and they get to open it, it’s like wow, your pickles or something.

The other thing also, I think, is that they see us eating it. So we add sauerkraut or kimchi to our plate all the time. Or it might be put on top of the salad, and they just get naturally curious.

And I don’t force foods. I just say, would you like to try some? And another trick that I definitely — trick, that makes it sound so devious, but it’s not — around trying new foods is that, when we sit at the dinner table, we just have bowls of stuff, so they can help themselves, you know? If it’s sausages and potatoes and some veggies, they get to pick and choose things on they plate. If there’s a bowl of sauerkraut there, they’ll just dip the spoon and put some on their plate, and they’re so much more likely to eat it.

But you do have to be careful with fermented foods. You can’t go from zero to here straightaway. It’s important to start slowly with them. It can make you quite gassy. They don’t actually need that much in order to be getting some really good benefits.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

I think we discovered that the hard way. When we were starting to introduce some fermented foods, we bought a whole bottle of kombucha and gave it to my son, and he was a bit sensitive at first. Again, it’s that reminder, you know that I think they need exposure over time. I’ve heard lots of people talking about kids needing to be introduced to foods sometimes 15 times before they’ll take a liking to it, which blew my mind, and the bank account, too.

But I think that over time, they do develop that taste, preference as well. He then one day decided to consume a whole bottle and we really discovered the gassy side effects of going gung-ho. So I think that’s important. And again, what ties in so nicely with your whole philosophy is just those small incremental steps that we need to implement.

Our second one’s a bit of a selective eater. When we started to make some of our fermented foods, his involvement was a really big point of difference. He loves that sizzle, too. He knows when he hears that sizzle — he calls it sizzle day, so there’s that sense of anticipation. And kids love being involved in the cooking process. It’s so important.

In the module I talked a lot about trying to modulate kids’ stress. Feeling like they belong and that they’ve got strong family rituals is really important in helping children regulate their stress as well. Cooking is you know, such an important part of our life and for our kids as well.

Lisa Corduff:

You know so much good stuff, Kristy.

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

I do! I just want to tie (in) one thing and then we’ll wrap it up after this. When you were talking before about our kids copying us, eating particular types of foods, we know from the neuroscience that our kids have something called mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are basically little nerves that cause our kids to copy all our partners’ worst habits.

Our brains are primed to copy. This is why newborn babies poke their tongue out after 15 minutes even after they’ve been breastfed. We’re literally born wired to copy, and our kids are doing that, so I think that’s such a powerful reminder too that you know we need to make those small steps over time and for our kids to be exposed to us eating the sort of food that we want to that will promote their gut health. So again there’s the science behind it.

Lisa Corduff:

Ugh, I just love hearing that there’s science behind my random parenting, you know?

Dr. Kristy Goodwin:

Absolutely. Absolutely. I want to wrap up by saying a huge thank you for your time.

This interview has been slightly edited for clarity. You can watch the whole interview on Dr. Kristy Goodwin’s module in the Kids Gut Health Masterclass.

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 23 August 2016
references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • Doc id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

make a comment

4 comments

latest articles

view more

MEET THE EXPERTS

view more