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Lisa Kelly

Curator Kids Health Australia

BA Marketing and Mother of Two

WELLBEING

The 61 Names for Sugar

By Lisa Kelly

Posted  December 6 2016 | 0 Shares

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Sugar permeates almost every single piece of food we put into our mouths, which makes it tricky if you’ve been trying to watch your intake. Even worse, nutrition labels can be so misleading, because there are at least 61 names for sugar in use, most of which we’ve probably never heard of.

What’s in a name? That which we call “sugar,” by any other name would still be… sugar! Many of us will do our best to only serve whole foods and meals cooked from scratch, but buying packaged food products is still mostly unavoidable. This should be ok, because food labels will warn us about sugar content, right? Wrong. There are 61 different names for sugar used in food labels, some fairly easy to recognise: Barbados sugar, castor sugar, corn syrup, raw sugar.

Some, however, could completely slip under the radar: maltodextrin, maltol, HFCS, dextrin. And how’s this for ridiculous: dehydrated cane juice and evaporated cane juice. Sounds like an overly convoluted name for plain old sugar, doesn’t it? That’s because it is!

If I didn’t know any better, I’d start thinking that food labels might be deliberately confusing me to make me just give up.

Read: “Natural” and “preservative-free” labels may hide more sugars than you think

The 61 Names for Sugar

The next time you look at food labels and want to see the complete list of sugars it contains, watch out for these items. Hot tip: save this on your phone! You can save our infographic below or download our PDF here.

Agave nectar

Barbados sugar

Barley malt

Barley malt syrup

Beet sugar

Brown sugar

Buttered syrup

Cane juice

Cane juice crystals

Cane sugar

Caramel

Carob syrup

Castor sugar

Coconut palm sugar

Coconut sugar

Confectioner’s sugar

Corn sweetener

Corn syrup

Corn syrup solids

Date sugar

Dehydrated cane juice

Maltose

Mannose

Maple syrup

Molasses

Muscovado

Palm sugar

Panocha

Powdered sugar

Raw sugar

Refiner’s syrup

Rice syrup

Saccharose

Sorghum Syrup

Sucrose

Sugar (granulated)

Sweet Sorghum

Syrup

Treacle

Turbinado sugar

Yellow sugar

Demerara sugar

Dextrin

Dextrose

Evaporated cane juice

Free-flowing brown sugars

Fructose

Fruit juice

Fruit juice concentrate

Glucose

Glucose solids

Golden sugar

Golden syrup

Grape sugar

HFCS (High-Fructose Corn Syrup)

Honey

Icing sugar

Invert sugar

Malt syrup

Maltodextrin

Maltol

The 61 Names for Sugar | Kids Health Australia | list of sugars

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 6 December 2016 references
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This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

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The 61 Names for Sugar

WELLBEING

By Lisa Kelly

Sugar permeates almost every single piece of food we put into our mouths, which makes it tricky if you’ve been trying to watch your intake. Even worse, nutrition labels can be so misleading, because there are at least 61 names for sugar in use, most of which we’ve probably never heard of.

What’s in a name? That which we call “sugar,” by any other name would still be… sugar! Many of us will do our best to only serve whole foods and meals cooked from scratch, but buying packaged food products is still mostly unavoidable. This should be ok, because food labels will warn us about sugar content, right? Wrong. There are 61 different names for sugar used in food labels, some fairly easy to recognise: Barbados sugar, castor sugar, corn syrup, raw sugar.

Some, however, could completely slip under the radar: maltodextrin, maltol, HFCS, dextrin. And how’s this for ridiculous: dehydrated cane juice and evaporated cane juice. Sounds like an overly convoluted name for plain old sugar, doesn’t it? That’s because it is!

If I didn’t know any better, I’d start thinking that food labels might be deliberately confusing me to make me just give up.

Read: “Natural” and “preservative-free” labels may hide more sugars than you think

The 61 Names for Sugar

The next time you look at food labels and want to see the complete list of sugars it contains, watch out for these items. Hot tip: save this on your phone! You can save our infographic below or download our PDF here.

Agave nectar

Barbados sugar

Barley malt

Barley malt syrup

Beet sugar

Brown sugar

Buttered syrup

Cane juice

Cane juice crystals

Cane sugar

Caramel

Carob syrup

Castor sugar

Coconut palm sugar

Coconut sugar

Confectioner’s sugar

Corn sweetener

Corn syrup

Corn syrup solids

Date sugar

Dehydrated cane juice

Maltose

Mannose

Maple syrup

Molasses

Muscovado

Palm sugar

Panocha

Powdered sugar

Raw sugar

Refiner’s syrup

Rice syrup

Saccharose

Sorghum Syrup

Sucrose

Sugar (granulated)

Sweet Sorghum

Syrup

Treacle

Turbinado sugar

Yellow sugar

Demerara sugar

Dextrin

Dextrose

Evaporated cane juice

Free-flowing brown sugars

Fructose

Fruit juice

Fruit juice concentrate

Glucose

Glucose solids

Golden sugar

Golden syrup

Grape sugar

HFCS (High-Fructose Corn Syrup)

Honey

Icing sugar

Invert sugar

Malt syrup

Maltodextrin

Maltol

The 61 Names for Sugar | Kids Health Australia | list of sugars

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 6 December 2016
references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • Doc id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

make a comment

3 comments

more articles by Lisa Kelly

view more

latest articles

view more

MEET THE EXPERTS

view more