Does my child have an eating disorder?

By Tracie Hyam Connor APD

Posted  May 14 2016 | 0 Shares

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Does my child have an eating disorder? 

Eating disorders affect almost a million young Australians* , and the numbers are growing each year, so there’s no wonder many parents have a concern. As a health professional working with families, I’m very familiar with recognising and treating eating disorders, including intentional under eating and over eating.  There are some tell tale signs that indicate your child may have an eating disorder include:

 

  • A preoccupation with weight, food, food preparation, food labels &/or dieting
  • An excessive exercise regime or no longer desiring to exercise/ play group sports
  • Avoiding meals and situations with food
  • Noticeable weight loss, weight gain &/or weight fluctuations
  • Displays ongoing anxiety &/or depression in conjunction with other mentioned symptoms

 

 

5 Steps to take to help them

If you have concern about your childs eating behaviours, there is help and professional advice available. Steps you can take before seeking help include:

 

  • Speaking with your child, asking them how they feel socially, at school, with family etc and also how they feel about their body. Its best not to imply anything, aim to listen more than question.
  • Providing nourishing, healthy meals and snacks, and limiting access to unhealthy foods will encourage healthy behaviours
  • Be a good role model; eating healthy and balanced meals with family, enjoy exercise in appropriate amounts and not obsessing with your weight or talking negatively about yours or others weight
  • Seek professional advice. Speaking with your GP, a Registered Nutritionist or Psychologist is a great start and you don’t need a referral to see them. Also online resources and counselling from Butterfly Foundation provide support without leaving the house.

 

 

Reviewed by Tracie Hyam Connor APD 14 May 2016 references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • document id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

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Does my child have an eating disorder?

Does my child have an eating disorder? 

Eating disorders affect almost a million young Australians* , and the numbers are growing each year, so there’s no wonder many parents have a concern. As a health professional working with families, I’m very familiar with recognising and treating eating disorders, including intentional under eating and over eating.  There are some tell tale signs that indicate your child may have an eating disorder include:

 

  • A preoccupation with weight, food, food preparation, food labels &/or dieting
  • An excessive exercise regime or no longer desiring to exercise/ play group sports
  • Avoiding meals and situations with food
  • Noticeable weight loss, weight gain &/or weight fluctuations
  • Displays ongoing anxiety &/or depression in conjunction with other mentioned symptoms

 

 

5 Steps to take to help them

If you have concern about your childs eating behaviours, there is help and professional advice available. Steps you can take before seeking help include:

 

  • Speaking with your child, asking them how they feel socially, at school, with family etc and also how they feel about their body. Its best not to imply anything, aim to listen more than question.
  • Providing nourishing, healthy meals and snacks, and limiting access to unhealthy foods will encourage healthy behaviours
  • Be a good role model; eating healthy and balanced meals with family, enjoy exercise in appropriate amounts and not obsessing with your weight or talking negatively about yours or others weight
  • Seek professional advice. Speaking with your GP, a Registered Nutritionist or Psychologist is a great start and you don’t need a referral to see them. Also online resources and counselling from Butterfly Foundation provide support without leaving the house.

 

 

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 14 May 2016
references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • Doc id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

make a comment

0 comments

latest articles

view more

MEET THE EXPERTS

view more