PARENTING

Are you and your child ready for ‘Big School’?

By Rebecca Watson

Posted  December 3 2015 | 0 Shares

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Are you and your child ready for ‘Big School’?

Top tips for transitioning from preschool to school to help him or her thrive and flourish.

The Transition from preschool to ‘big school’ is an important time in your child’s life – and yours. Giving your child important skills to help them enter school with confidence helps them to thrive and flourish. At Only About Children, Australia’s leading early years learning provider, they aim to inspire a lifelong love of learning in your child.

At this time of your child’s life, he or she is busy exploring new friendships, learning to make decisions, and becoming more aware of his or her own unique talents and abilities. Providing a stimulating and nurturing environment is vitally important.

Here are 6 tips from Only About Children to help you and your child through the process:

  1. Practice self-care skills, such as dressing, packing a bag and opening and closing a lunch box and drink bottle and going to the bathroom. Encouraging your child to develop these skills will give them the self-confidence to know they are able to do it on their own.
  2. Play number and letter games with your child to introduce the concept of counting and letter recognition. This can be easily incorporated in everyday activities such as counting the number of toys on the floor or pointing out words when reading aloud to them. Encourage your child’s listening and attention skills by reading stories to them, practice holding books, turning papers and singing nursery rhymes. Asking questions about the story or song can also support your child’s understanding of communication skills.
  3. Help your child to develop gross motor skills, a fundamental base skill to many areas of learning. Using scissors or glue, drawing with a pencil, building with blocks or helping with the cooking can all help children to develop gross motor skills.
  4. Allow your children to become familiar with the school they are attending. This will help them feel more confident and comfortable on their first day. Visit their new school and attend any school orientations that are offered. This will allow you to meet other families in the school community.
  5. Provide opportunities for your child to play with other children to develop their social skills. Children should be able to share, take turns during play and develop friendships. Teaching your child how to introduce themselves to other children and join in play with others will help them feel confident and build friendships at school.
  6. Talk with the child’s current kindergarten teacher and determine if any of the above areas require extra attention or practice. At Only About Children, their in-house Health Team, including speech pathologists and occupational therapists conduct ready for school screenings and test all the above areas. This ensures that children are happy, confident and capable as they transition to school

Reviewed by Rebecca Watson 3 December 2015 references
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This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

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Are you and your child ready for ‘Big School’?

PARENTING

Are you and your child ready for ‘Big School’?

Top tips for transitioning from preschool to school to help him or her thrive and flourish.

The Transition from preschool to ‘big school’ is an important time in your child’s life – and yours. Giving your child important skills to help them enter school with confidence helps them to thrive and flourish. At Only About Children, Australia’s leading early years learning provider, they aim to inspire a lifelong love of learning in your child.

At this time of your child’s life, he or she is busy exploring new friendships, learning to make decisions, and becoming more aware of his or her own unique talents and abilities. Providing a stimulating and nurturing environment is vitally important.

Here are 6 tips from Only About Children to help you and your child through the process:

  1. Practice self-care skills, such as dressing, packing a bag and opening and closing a lunch box and drink bottle and going to the bathroom. Encouraging your child to develop these skills will give them the self-confidence to know they are able to do it on their own.
  2. Play number and letter games with your child to introduce the concept of counting and letter recognition. This can be easily incorporated in everyday activities such as counting the number of toys on the floor or pointing out words when reading aloud to them. Encourage your child’s listening and attention skills by reading stories to them, practice holding books, turning papers and singing nursery rhymes. Asking questions about the story or song can also support your child’s understanding of communication skills.
  3. Help your child to develop gross motor skills, a fundamental base skill to many areas of learning. Using scissors or glue, drawing with a pencil, building with blocks or helping with the cooking can all help children to develop gross motor skills.
  4. Allow your children to become familiar with the school they are attending. This will help them feel more confident and comfortable on their first day. Visit their new school and attend any school orientations that are offered. This will allow you to meet other families in the school community.
  5. Provide opportunities for your child to play with other children to develop their social skills. Children should be able to share, take turns during play and develop friendships. Teaching your child how to introduce themselves to other children and join in play with others will help them feel confident and build friendships at school.
  6. Talk with the child’s current kindergarten teacher and determine if any of the above areas require extra attention or practice. At Only About Children, their in-house Health Team, including speech pathologists and occupational therapists conduct ready for school screenings and test all the above areas. This ensures that children are happy, confident and capable as they transition to school

Reviewed by Lisa Kelly 3 December 2015
references
  • current version

  • PEER REVIEWER

  • Doc id

  • next review

This document has been developed and peer reviewed by a KIDS HEALTH Advisory Board Representative and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner.

make a comment

0 comments

latest articles

view more

MEET THE EXPERTS

view more